Monthly Archives: November 2014

Susan Scarlata on D.A. Powell and language

In his poem [splat in the oatmeal: granddaddy facedown] D.A. Powell provides an inkling of ars poetica and/or growth and knowledge of his understanding of language. He writes: …biblical words latched onto the vernacular. challenges and curses sometimes a prayer … Continue reading

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Susan Scarlata on Danielle Pafunda & Animals Set Loose

Danielle Pafunda’s “Beshrew Upon The Fence” is as much a spell as a poem. In it, the speaker reveals the following: This is how I get you to come in the yard. I set the bees loose. I set the … Continue reading

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On Linnea Ogden, Mice and that Ring by Susan Scarlata

Linnea Ogden’s poems and the lines within them are entirely matter-of-fact. In her poem “Powderhorn Park,” (forthcoming in Hick Poetics,) this line demonstrates exactly what I mean: I am holding a dead mouse when the phone rings. In ten words … Continue reading

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Susan Scarlata On the World & the Earth in Aaron McCollough’s “Rank”

Toward the end of his poem “Rank” Aaron McCollough calls up a differentiation between the words “world” and “earth” and the various things they each represent. He writes: the world is coming, but it’s not the world, what’s coming is … Continue reading

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Susan Scarlata on Ada Limón, yonder

Okay, so this is two lines with a lot of goodness sandwiched between them, but I want to write about both the first and last lines of one stanza in Ada Limón’s poem “During the Impossible Age of Everyone.” Limón … Continue reading

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Susan Scarlata on Collier Nogues, grime and waiting

Collier Nogues’ “A Small Hot Town” starts with a parallel reference to its title through a pronoun immediately standing in for the noun “town.” With the tiny possessiveness within “its” we are shown how tightly connected the river and this … Continue reading

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